Travel

Sensoji Temple in Summer

It’s that time of the year when you feel sweaty, droughty, and tired most of the time. Sunny season is officially here in Japan! It may be really hot, but it doesn’t mean I will stop exploring the country. This kind of weather can be irritating at times, right? However, keep cool and go out!

I first heard about Asakusa from a student of mine when I was still teaching English online back in Cebu. If you want to see and feel an atmosphere of the past decades of Tokyo, Asakusa is the place to be. It is known as the center of Tokyo’s low city and is just one of Tokyo’s districts that makes you feel like being in the past.

So my husband took a day off on a Monday in the hope of evading the crowd. And it’s summer! I had a thought that there would be less people in the area. He took me to the main attraction of Asakusa as I wished to have a quick visit.

While making our way to our destination from the station, I had a different feeling as I witnessed hordes of tourists/ travelers walking around the area. They all had ways to still enjoy strolling under the bright hot sun. Some wore skimpy clothes and hats of various designs and types. Some had these cute little fans and umbrellas. On the other hand, I saw few tourists wearing kimono and the traditional footwear with hair and makeup on. I was impressed by their patience in the name of culture experience.

tokyo skytree
Tokyo Skytree is located just a few minutes away from Asakusa.

As soon as we got to the famous Buddhist temple, boy was I taken aback!

sensoji temple
Sensoji Temple’s front

People of different nationalities surrounded the temple. it was the total opposite of my expectation. Danny and I still managed to roam around the area.

sensoji temple asakusa

The part where the believers pray and toss coins. There was a long crooked queue.

asakusa sensoji temple

An incense burner that looks like a well. Burning incense is a Buddhist practice.

sensoji temple

These are all wishes. I wonder what were written in these pieces of paper.

In case you’re caught by hunger and thirst, you don’t have to go far. Local restaurants and food stalls are just around the temple.

sensoji temple asakusa japan

And if you’re up to a shopping galore, a street approaching the temple is called Nakamise where you can see a variety of traditional, local snacks and tourist souvenirs being sold. Take these for example…

katana
Look at the price tags!

Japanese swords (katana)

Touring Asakusa on foot is not a problem. However if you want to try something traditional, consider a guided tour on a pulled rickshaw, jinrikisha. It’s a man-powered vehicle and a bit pricey for me.

japanese pulled rickshaw

Would you try this?

The weather and the sights were overwhelming. I guess, summer can’t really stop people from traveling. So I might as well not expect a popular attraction to be less crowded even in this hot season to avoid any disappointment. Given the situation, I wonder how it will be in autumn. Would it be the same or different?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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17 thoughts on “Sensoji Temple in Summer

  1. Sensoji is a rather “cosmopolitan” temple. (-_^)
    The whole area has a unique character that’s risen around the tourist market, but there’s also a very old neighborhood undercurrent if you know where to look.

    FYI — The tied paper “wishes” are unwanted “omikuji,” or temple fortunes. Acquiring one is usually a New Year tradition done during the three days of Hatsumode. It involves a small donation followed by a game-of-chance, often shaking a box containing 144 carved sticks, then allowing one stick to escape through a small hole. The stick can be handed to an attendant, or a recipient can search a special chest for the appropriate drawer. The fortune is written on a small sheet of paper that’s folded into a long, thin rectangle.

    If the fortune is good, the omikuji is kept for the year (often in your wallet). If it’s not so good, it was traditionally tied to a pine tree (“matsu”) where it would be left to wait (also “matsu”) — kind of like playing hide-and-seek with someone you don’t intend on seeking. So those are the fortunes that have left for the temple monks to deal with.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Interesting! I also hate traveling during summer. Too crowded plus the heat is unbearable. I’ve tried traveling during winter and I couldn’t take the cold either.😂 Would love to go to Japan someday! That man-powered vehicle looks like a small carriage without a horse.😁

    Liked by 1 person

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